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Impact craters are common on all solar system bodies. They offer many clues to scientists regarding the geologic history of a planetary surface, particularly regarding its age, evolution with time, and composition.

For instance, this image covers an impact crater on the southeastern flank of Ascraeus Mons, a notable volcano in the Tharsis Plateau. Based on the original science rationale for acquiring this image, by gaining more information about its depth and consequently the stability of the crater wall, we can learn more about the nature of the volcano’s flank materials.

Also, by carefully studying the materials exposed in the crater walls, we can gain more information about the subsurface.


Image: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona https://www.uahirise.org/hipod/ESP_069897_1895
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