Dark Light

Why does HiRISE take so many repeat images of the same area? Repeat coverage actually serves a special purpose, such as detecting seasonal changes (frost deposition and sublimation) and temporal changes (dust devil tracks and avalanches.) These repeat images also give us a “sneak peek” of future pictures to determine any differences.

Such is the case for this observation which we took in June 2014, and covers a small 1-kilometer sized simple crater located in the Southern hemisphere. In this composite and enhanced image, the crater shows frost on all its south-facing slopes (e.g., the crater’s north wall and southern ejecta). This image was taken in late Martian winter as Mars is heading into spring.


Image: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona https://www.uahirise.org/hipod/ESP_037125_1315
Related Posts

Layered Bedrock

This un-named crater in southwestern Arabia Terra contains a treasure! Layered sediments are the key to the puzzle of Martian history. They tell us about the conditions that existed when the sediments were deposited, and how they changed over time.
Deuteronilus Mensae

The Hanging Crater

Queen Amytis had her Hanging Gardens in Babylon, and Mars has its hanging crater! This impact crater appears…
Terra Sabaea

Possible Impact Melt in Terra Sabaea

Nighttime and daytime infrared images from THEMIS suggest a consolidated deposit in the floor of this ancient crater in Terra Sabaea, potentially with some bedrock exposure.

Layers in Meridiani Planum

Also visible in a Context Camera image, our high resolution picture shows layers exposed where the crater ejecta has been eroded.